Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971) | EYEDS
Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)

Scarf · Woodcut Print Edition · Artwork by Asger Jorn (1971)

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SCARF · WOODCUT PRINT EDITION 

The colourful scarfs add a great addition to our exclusive selection of design products with artwork by Asger Jorn (1914-1973).

Asger Jorn
Untitled, 1971
Woodcut, 325 x 420 mm

Scarf size: 75cm x 180cm
Composition: 100% new wool
Made in India

In 1971, Asger Jorn (1914-1973) and the printer Peter Bramsen printed 16 colour woodcuts at the latter’s workshop Clot, Bramsen et Georges in Paris. The prints clearly recall elements from the Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch’s (1883-1944) experiments with woodcuts where the motif is built up in the manner of a puzzle using printing plates plates cut to size.
The wood structure forms striking patterns and, together with a varying intensity of colour, it adds a certain depth and texture to the images.

The print was released in 1973 shortly after Jorn’s death as a ‘COBRA portfolio’ with other prints by Egil Jacobsen, Pierre Alechinsky, Karel Appel, and others

The great artwork is a perfection of banality and the shortcoming of most banalities is their not being sufficiently banal.
Quote by Asger Jorn